Affiliated Researchers

Michael Bravo

Michael Bravo

University Senior Lecturer, Department of Geography, University of Cambridge

Michael’s research examines a wide range of issues in history and public policy relating to the Polar Regions, in particular the challenge to enable alternative postcolonial framings of northern spaces to be articulated the dominant political frameworks. In June 2014, he launched with his Canadian partners an online atlas, http://paninuittrails.org, of Inuit trails spanning the Canadian Arctic drawing on maps drawn by Inuit from land claims and historical encounter literature. The atlas is linked to a project to examine what the concept of an ‘indigenous region’ means for Inuit who live on and around the waters of Canada’s High Arctic including the Northwest Passage. Michael’s books include Narrating the Arctic (2002, ed. with S. Sörlin) and Arctic Geopolitics and Autonomy (2011, ed. with N. Triscott).

Photo of Nancy Campbell

Nancy Campbell

Poet and Artist

Nancy Campbell is a poet and book artist. Her books combine her interests in language and printmaking, and her poetry has been widely published and features in the work of several visual artists; collaborative book projects include After Light (2009) with Paula Naughton and Dinner and a Rose (2010) with Sarah Bodman. Nancy held the Lady Margaret Hall Visual and Performing Arts Residency at the University of Oxford. She was also Writer-in-Residence at Upernavik Museum, Greenland in 2010; the resulting books How To Say ‘I Love You’ In Greenlandic (MIEL editions) and The Night Hunter and Tikilluarit (Z’roah Press) relate her experiences during the Arctic winter. Nancy has participated in residencies at other ecological and research institutions in Iceland, Denmark, the US and the UK. She was awarded a Hawthornden Fellowship in 2013, and is a Fellow of the International League of Conservation Writers.

Photo of Amy Cutler

Amy Cutler

Postdoctoral Research Fellow

Amy is a cultural geographer and Leverhulme fellow in the department of Geography at Royal Holloway, University of London. Her work focuses on historical geography and the cultures of nature, and she is founder of the cultural geography-themed cinema PASSENGERFILMS. She is convening a national conference on forest humanities in 2015, and her work Were X A Tree: Glosses on Larkin is being published by Punctum Books.

Tone Huse

Tone Huse

Research Fellow, Department of Sociology, Political Science and Community Planning, UiT The Arctic University of Norway

Tone’s doctoral research focuses on mobile practices in the context of urban efforts to mitigate climate change and the enactment of citizenship in the production of infrastructures and regimes of mobility. She is the author of Everyday Life in the Gentrifying City: On Displacement, Ethnic Privileging and the Right to Stay Put (Ashgate, 2014), the English-language version of her award-winning Tøyengata – et nyrikt stykke Norge.

Marianne Lien

Marianne Lien

Professor of Social Anthropology, University of Oslo

Marianne Lien’s work has long focused on questions of consumption, production and marketing, and in recent years she has published on economic anthropology, globalization, nature,  domestication and aquaculture. She was until 2013 director of the research project Newcomers to the farm: Atlantic salmon between the wild and the industrial. Marianne is the author (with Simone Abram) of Performing Nature at World’s Ends and of ‘Emergent Aliens’: On Salmon, Nature, and Their Enactment, co-authored with John Law.

David PIcard

David PIcard

Senior Researcher, Centre for Research in Anthropology (CRIA), New University of Lisbon

Currently based in Germany, David’s work focuses on the multiple realms of tourism, with particular interest in affect, photography, wine and the Arctic. He has held work appointments and visiting researcher positions at the Centre for Tourism and Cultural Change (CTCC), Leeds, United Kingdom (2002-2010) and the University of Queensland in Australia (2012). David is the author of Tourism, Magic and Modernity: Cultivating the Human Garden (Berghahn, 2011), and editor of Tourism and the Power of Otherness (Channel View Publications, 2014), The Framed World: Tourism, Tourists and Photography (Ashgate, 2009) and Emotion in Motion: Tourism, Affect and Transformation (Ashgate, 2012).

Juan Francisco Salazar

Juan Francisco Salazar

Associate Professor, University of Western Sydney

Juan Francisco Salazar is an anthropologist and media scholar/practitioner, with research interests and expertise centring on media anthropology, visual/digital ethnography, citizens’ media, documentary cinemas, environmental communication, climate change and cultural studies of Antarctica. He is a co-author of the award-winning book Screen media arts: introduction to concepts and practices (Oxford University Press, 2008). As a media artist he has produced several documentary and experimental short films exhibited internationally and has been a digital storytelling trainer and producer in Sydney, Antofagasta and Antarctica. Since 2011, Juan has been co-convenor of the Social Sciences Action Group of the Scientific Committee for Antarctic Research (SCAR).

Philip Steinberg

Philip Steinberg

Professor of Geography, University of Durham

Philip’s research focuses on the historical, ongoing, and, at times, imaginary projection of social power onto spaces whose geophysical and geographic characteristics make them resistant to state territorialization. These spaces include the world-ocean, the Arctic, and the universe of electronic communications. He is the author of The Social Construction of the Ocean (2001, Cambridge University Press) and co-author of Contesting the Arctic: Politics and Imaginaries in the Circumpolar North (I.B. Tauris, 2014).

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